Jewelry

  • Lightbox Jewelry Seizes the Lab-Grown Diamond Moment

    Below, Coe talks to JCK aboutthe status of Lightbox’s new factory near Portland, Ore.; what the brand haslearned about consumers’ take on colored diamonds; and why the company recentlyintroduced grading reports for its products. What are your biggest initiatives for 2020? The opening of the new manufacturing facility in Oregon. It’s already well advanced. The building is complete and services are complete. They are literally installing reactors as we speak. It will come online the second half of this year and will give us significantly more volume of product—something like 200,000 polished carats per year. That will enable us to get into much wider distribution than today. Today, our production is significantly lower because we’re doing it out of Element Six in the U.K. This factory is a game changer. It’s going to ramp up over a period of time; the idea is that by the end of the year, it will be fully running. How are sales? They’re going well. Very positive. We’re doing a trial with Reeds—we’re in 45 of their doors and in two doors with Bloomingdale’s. The trial runs through the end of…

    March 17, 2020
  • Lightbox to Include More Grading Information With Its Diamonds

    Lightbox, which famously decided not to sell its lab-grown diamonds with grading reports, is now adding some general grading information to the white diamonds it sells that weigh more than 0.2 cts. Not surprisingly, it’s doing thingsdifferently than its peers, part of its ongoing effort to distinguish itsman-made diamonds from the natural gems sold by owner De Beers. For one, Lightbox will follow the GIA model of using general grade ranges, rather than the standard GIA color and clarity scales. For another, the brand will not grade each individual stone, but simply specify their minimum qualities. And so, starting Monday, its white diamonds will include tech spec cards that state that their color is “near colorless” (from G to J) or better, that their clarity is VS or above, and that their cut is at least “very good.” Those tech specs are also now listed online. Lightbox chief executive officer SteveCoe says that Lightbox can offer these specifications since it has a “rigorousquality-control process in place.” The change grew out of consumer feedback, headds. “Our customers wanted clarification. Theyasked a reasonable question: What is the quality of what you are selling here?” But the…

    February 17, 2020
  • Atelier Swarovski debuts pink lab-grown diamonds fit for a queen at 2020 BAFTAs

    As the official jewellery partner for the 2020 EE British Academy Film Awards, Atelier Swarovski unveiled its pink lab-grown diamond creations at the ceremony held at the Royal Albert Hall in London last night (Feb 2). OliviaColman, who plays the Queen in the latest series of The Crown, illuminated theEE British Academy Film Awards wearing a bespoke set of jewels featuring thefirst pink Swarovski created-diamonds from Atelier Swarovski. The unique stones have been described as ‘fancy purplish pink’, with the set adorning Coleman including cluster earrings with detachable drops, and two cocktail rings handcrafted in London with recycled 18ct white gold paired with lab-grown sapphires and diamonds. This yearmarks Atelier Swarovski’s fifth year as the Official Jewellery Partner of theEE British Academy Film Awards. Chiefexecutive of BAFTA, Amanda Berry, comments: “We are doing more than ever beforeto ensure that the EE British Academy Film Awards in 2020 are carbon neutral,working towards a net positive impact for future ceremonies. Our long-standingpartnership with Atelier Swarovski, and their sustainability efforts on the redcarpet, support our commitment to the Awards being as sustainable as…

    February 3, 2020
  • Swarovski Debuts 16 New Lab-Created Diamond Colors

    Swarovski is looking to dominate in thecoloured lab-grown diamond market with the launch of 16 new stones. The world-renowned Austrian producer ofprecision-cut crystals, genuine gemstones and created stones first launchedlab-grown diamonds in 2018. This January, during Paris Haute CoutureFashion Week, the firm introduced coloured lab-grown diamonds to its portfolio. According to Swarovski, its curation of 16coloured lab-grown diamonds are “the most extensive, sophisticated assortmentof hues available on the global laboratory created diamond market today”. The fancy colours in the new Swarovski CreatedDiamonds collection are arranged according to four pillars, each referencingone of the creative communities in which the company has always played a vitalrole: fashion, art, music and architecture. These four pillars pay homage to Swarovski’shistory of mutually creative collaborations, and to the creativity on whichSwarovski’s heritage and enduring ingenuity were built. Each pillar containsfour cushion cut laboratory created diamonds, led by a hero colour – theboldest of the four – available in a 2.5 carat size. The other three coloursare 1.25 carats each. Every laboratory created diamond isimmaculately cut and polished according to the Swarovski standards of precisionand excellence,…

    January 23, 2020
  • Signet Now Selling Lab-Created Diamonds at All U.S. Banners

    SignetJewelers is increasing its embrace of lab-grown diamonds and isselling them at all its major U.S. jewelry banners. SpokespersonDavid Bouffard tells JCK that “lab-created diamonds areavailable in both fashion and bridal jewelry at James Allen, Kay, Zales, and Jaredstores, as well as their e-commerce sites.” (The only U.S. Signet banner thatdoesn’t seem to be carrying them is Piercing Pagoda.) About two months ago, Kay’s Modern Creation line was sold at only four Kay locations in Florida, and Zales was not selling them at all. Now, they are being sold at all Kay and Zales stores. TheSignet sites don’t give lab-growns the same full-throated endorsement thatwe have seen from other companies—perhaps a reflection of the difficultbalancing act faced by a company with millions in natural diamond inventory. It won’t accept lab created for trade-in, and its ad copy and accompanying chart (below) point out that natural diamonds have their advantages, too. It notes that diamonds “from the Earth” are “historically” likely to maintain long-term value, while it’s “unknown at this time” what will happen to the long-term value of lab created. It says that the natural supply is “finite and rare,” while the lab-grown supply…

    December 10, 2019